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Human-Computer Interaction with Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle

In the 19th Episode of the GDMS Podcast, we discuss Human-Computer Interaction with Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle.
Human-Computer Interaction with Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle
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Human-Computer Interaction with Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle

watch the Video feed here

Audio Podcast feed here

Available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify Podcasts, and Anchor Podcasts

In the 19th Episode of the GDMS Podcast, we discuss Human-Computer Interaction with Virginia Tech Professor Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle. We also discuss the following:

  • Original Digital Art being sold for $69 Million
  • If there is a market for copywriting the digital art
  • Art, in general, is subjective

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In our in-depth interview with Virginia Tech Professor Dr. Ali Haksins Lisle we discuss:

  • Dr. Lisle explains what the Human-Computer Interaction field is and what these types of Engineers strive to do
  • Human-Computer Interaction in particular usually involves a couple of different disciplines.  Dr. Lisle discusses the disciplines she is trained in.
  • What initially attracted Dr. Lisle to the Human-Computer Interaction field
  • UX is something that has been around for decades but has recently been rebranded during the past decade to encompass web design
  • Dr. Lisle explains ethnography to our listeners
  • Besides usability tests, what other kind of testing Dr. Lisle performs in her line of work
  • Some of the more interesting human-computer interaction scientific tests that she has performed
  • What it has been like joining the HHS right before the pandemic, and what it has been like working there over the past year
  • What goes into developing an algorithm
  • With documentaries like “The Social Dilemma”, gaining popularity, ethically how do you feel about developing algorithms?
  • How people put unconscious bias into algorithms that they develop without even knowing it
  • Her favorite scary movie, both A-List and D-List
  • Her favorite moment during her Virginia Tech Football Fandom

glorious marketing of the week

Digital Artwork sells for a record $69 million at Christie's first NFT auction

This week the first purely digital piece of artwork was sold in an NFT format for $69 + Million. The art was sold using blockchain technology and signed with an unforgeable NFT signature.  There are a few reasons we believe that happened.  Let’s explore them now.

  • How blockchain is making it easy for people to invest in things that have no inherent value
  • Art, in general, is subjective and its always hard to put an actual price point on it

Copywrite royalties could be factor

The piece of digital artwork that was sold was a compilation of hundreds of smaller pictures that are some of the internet’s most shared memes and pictures.  

When the person purchased the art, they also purchased the original copies of these highly shared pictures.

It’s possible that the owner did so in order to try to collect money when people on the internet share those pictures and memes.  Each time those are shared, the owner can now possibly charge the person sharing them for a small fee.

Since this picture is composed of hundreds of the most shared pictures, it’s quite possible that the new owner stands to make millions in royalty fees.

Blockchain Investments

Blockchain was invented in order to create a digital, unanimous, unhackable digital auditing system that could be used to create a purely digital currency.

Since the advent of blockchain, it has been implemented to transform many different business industries from food, healthcare, and accounting.  Most notably, it has become a tradeable commodity with things such as bitcoin and dogecoin.

Basically, something digital with no tangible value accumulates value from people buying into it.

This digital art is no different.  It has a value of millions of dollars, and in the future, people will buy into that value and raise it or sell their shares, and drop the value.

Art is Subjective

At the end of the day, art is subjective.  It doesn’t matter what anyone thinks, but the buyer.  This digital art is worth millions of dollars because one person valued it that much.  One person is all it takes!

Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle Professor in Human-Computer Interaction Engineering

Human-Computer Interaction Engineering with Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle
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Human-Computer Interaction with Dr. Ali Haskins Lisle

watch the Video feed here

Audio Podcast feed here

Available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify Podcasts, and Anchor Podcasts

In the 18th Episode of the GDMS Podcast, we discuss Leadership and Coaching with Virginia Tech Hokie Hall of Famer Cornell Brown. We also discuss the following:

  • The HBO Max documentary Fake Famous
  • The future of Social Influencing
  • A Marketing Minute with Matt on how to use Geotagging

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In our in-depth interview with Virginia Tech Football Hall of Famer Cornell Brown we discuss:

  • Who Cornell’s mentors were growing up
  • What he finds the best part of competing
  • His recruitment to Virginia Tech
  • What it was like being a part of the team that beat Texas in the Sugar Bowl in 1995
  • Having a chip on his shoulder after getting drafted in the 6th round by the Ravens
  • What was it like to be a part of the best defense the NFL has ever had
  • The difference between coaching under Nick Saban and coaching under Coach Beamer
  • What’s the most important leadership lesson that he has learned
  • What has motivated Cornell the most during his coaching career
  • How he implements a gameplan from the Defensive Coordinator at a player level
  • How Huddle disrupted the way coaches find talent
  • How social media changed the way you recruit players
  • What it’s like having to compete for players throughout their entire playing careers and continue to get them to buy into what you are coaching with the advent of the Transfer Portal
  • Cornell’s favorite scary movie
  • One of the best Lester Karlin stories we have heard to date

glorious marketing of the week

"Fake Famous" Brings Light to the Fake side of social INfluencing

The new documentary HBO Max Documentary, “Fake Famous”, takes three normal people, and with a mixture of movie magic and the right, technology turns all three of them into Social Influencers.  

The documentary brings light to some ethical dilemmas going on in the social influencing realm right now such as:

  • Where should the line between staged content and advertisements drawn?
  • Should tech companies like Facebook and Twitter regulate the industry more closely?
  • How can data be better regulated to prevent fake influencers from popping upg?

bots Help launch influencers careers

After three lucky people were selected to take part in the “Fake Famous” documentary, the producers took their social media profiles and hired a Bot company to help raise their followers on Instagram.

There was a noticeable steady climb in followers for each of the three influencers participating in this experiment.  

As their followers grew, and bots started commenting on their posts, the participants’ friends started to take notice of the suspicious exponential growth of their accounts, and sometimes strange comments left by the bots.

Some of the participants felt weird about what they were doing as more and more of their friends approached them about what they were doing. 

Some professional photography goes a long way

After each of the participants grew their audience, the producers took professional photo shoots of each of them doing something that they enjoyed.

One contestant was shot working out in his garage.  The professional photographer made it look like he was working out in a gym by snapping the right pictures.

One participant was shot in her backyard.  The photoshoot was set up to make it look like she was on an exotic trip to another country.  They tagger her in an exotic location.  The mixture of the professional pictures and the geotagging made her audience think she was actually there.

There is even a place in Los Angeles where you can take pictures in a jet to make it seem like you are traveling.  These pictures are used by social influencers to fake trips around the world and eventually land endorsements for the potential influencers.

Companies see inflated numbers on the Instagram photos, they see the acticity those influencers are doing, and if their brand or product aligns, they will send the influencer their product to use in photoshoots.

Should big tech stop the fraud?

Every step of the way people and businesses are making money.  The bot companies make money, Facebook/Instagram makes money, the influencer eventually makes money, and the companies providing products to them also make money.  

There is no incentive for big tech to stop the fraud.  They are willing participants, but millions or people are duped by these fake advertisements.  

Two out of the three participants ended up pulling themselves from the documentary.  They didn’t feel right about what they were doing.  

As more and more fraud happens one has to ask where does Government come in to prevent it from happening?  

 

Cornell Brown

Cornell Brown Head Shot

Virginia Tech Hall of Famer – Cornell Brown

ornell Brown Playing at Virginia Tech
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